Monthly Archives: September 2013

Why sharing your content via email alone isn’t enough

Last week a lawyer asked me why he should share content on LinkedIn if that same content was already being sent to his connections via email.

It’s a good question.

And there are three good answers.

Why share content on both LinkedIn and your emails

1. Don’t assume people read your emails

Even though you send people your email newsletters and updates it doesn’t mean they read them. When people are busy they often ignore newsletters and other news alerts. Often they intend to read them but don’t get around to it, they place them in a folder to look at if needed or they simply hit delete.  Note: If you are using Mailchimp, iContact or a similar campaign service to send your emails you will be able to track who has opened your emails and other key stats. Continue reading

14 ways to Grow your LinkedIn Company Page Followers

The old adage ‘build it and they will come’ isn’t quite true when it comes to your social media presence.

Especially your LinkedIn Company Page.

14 ways to grow your LinkedIn company page followers

A question I’m regularly asked is ‘how do we grow our company page followers?’ so I’ve set out below 14 things firms could do RIGHT NOW. Continue reading

How to handle online complaints in this social media age

Last week a contact of mine, Guy Alvarez, shared a link to an article about a British Airways passenger who had paid over $1,000 on a promoted tweet telling people not to fly the airline because it lost his luggage.

How to handle online complaints in this social media age

BA’s customer service team didn’t handle the situation well so the passenger paid to get his message heard and made sure it appeared in the twitter feeds of followers of BA.

Ouch. Continue reading

Be passionate and know your niche – positioning yourself online

If you want to use social media to help you position yourself, you’ve got to answer a fundamental question first:

What do you want to be known for?

It sounds like a simple enough question but it’s amazing how many professionals don’t have a clear answer.

You can’t be all things to all people, so the first step is to define your niche – what issues or things are you going to help people with and who are these people? For example, a divorce lawyer might position themselves as a divorce lawyer for women or a childs rights’ advocate. An accountant may position themselves as a virtual CFO…the opportunities are endless. Continue reading