Monthly Archives: February 2014

Professionals: stop wasting your time on LinkedIn

“‘Cheshire Puss,’ she began, rather timidly, as she did not at all know whether it would like the name: however, it only grinned a little wider. `Come, it’s pleased so far,’ thought Alice, and she went on. `Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?’

‘That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,’ said the Cat.

`I don’t much care where–’ said Alice.

`Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,’ said the Cat.

`–so long as I get SOMEWHERE,’ Alice added as an explanation.

`Oh, you’re sure to do that,’ said the Cat, `if you only walk long enough.’”  ~Lewis Carroll in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Professionals: stop wasting your time on LinkedIn

It seems that many professionals are on LinkedIn but are doing nothing with it. Like Alice, they’re wandering aimlessly. Yet many think that LinkedIn’s going to miraculously deliver them some work.

It won’t.

Not unless you put the time and effort in and use it purposefully.

The top 8 ways professionals waste time on LinkedIn and a solution for each!

# 1: Not being clear about what you want LinkedIn to help you to achieve and how you’re going to use it

If you don’t have clear goals then what are you going to measure?

And how are you going to use the platform consistently over time to:

  • expand your knowledge,
  • position yourself,
  • overcome being pigeon-holed,
  • stay top of mind with your existing clients and/or
  • attract more of your ideal prospects?

Solution: download our LinkedIn action plan template and use it to determine how you will use the platform.

# 2: Using LinkedIn in isolation

LinkedIn works best when it’s used to support your other efforts. It can be a catalyst for getting new work but it’s rarely the sole reason why. Yet it can add rocket-fuel to your existing business development and marketing initiatives.

If you want to know how, take a look at the posts highlighted below, each of which deal with a different aspect of professional services firm’s BD and marketing activities:

How can professional services firms use social media to increase their tender success rate?

11 ways to showcase your expertise using social media 

Social media: firing up key client and practice group planning

How to use LinkedIn to power up your events

Solution: Think about how LinkedIn can support your existing initiatives and incorporate this into your strategy.

# 3: Having a sub-standard profile

There is NO excuse for a sub-standard profile.

You’re a professional.

You want to make a good impression on both your existing connections, business partners, referrers and prospects.

How are you going to do that if you can’t even pull a decent profile together?

Solution: If you’re on LinkedIn to develop your practice, PLEASE PLEASE (at the very least) do the following:

- Upload a professional looking photo

- Make sure your professional headline says what you do or who and how you can help

- Customize your public profile URL (so that you get found before others’ who share your name)

- Complete the summary section setting out:

  • Who you help
  • What you help them with
  • Your approach to working with your clients
  • Some results you’ve achieved
  • A bit about your interests outside of work
  • A call to action.
- Upload or add links, tips, Whitepapers, presentations, videos…or anything that will help to EVIDENCE your capabilities. You can do so at the bottom of the summary section, and in the experience and education sections.
- List your skills in the skills and endorsements section. Make it easy for people to endorse you for skills for which you wish to be recognised. Otherwise, you’re likely to find yourself being endorsed for skills you don’t have (thanks to LinkedIn’s algorithm that determines suggestions in the blue box that appears on users homepages every now and again!)
- Make it easy for people to contact you by including your contact details within your profile – both in the contact info section and in the section RIGHT down the bottom ‘Contact [Name] for…’

# 4: not taking an active approach to connecting with others

LinkedIn at a very basic level is a living, breathing address book where people update their own details. It’s likely to be much more up-to-date than many professional services firms’ CRMs.

The more people you connect to, the more people see your status updates. You can use these to position yourself but if you’re not connected to many people then hardly anyone will see them.
And you won’t get as good search results when using LinkedIn’s Advanced Search feature (unless you opt for a paid account, or Xray search into LinkedIn using Google). This means it won’t be as useful a planning and research tool as it could be.
Solution: Connect to your colleagues (this will help you market yourself internally), your clients, referrers, and other business contacts and nurture these contacts – share status updates that they’re going to find useful.
Whenever you return from a new business meeting or event, invite the person/people you met to connect with you. Aim to grow your connections over time.

# 5: Inactivity

If you’ve decided you ONLY want to use LinkedIn as a living address book then don’t worry about being active.

BUT if you want to position yourself or grow your practice you need to get active. Otherwise you’re missing out on the opportunity to become synonymous with the work you do and to stay top of mind with the people you want to help.
Essentially, you’re making it easy for them to choose one of your competitors over you!
Solution: Aim to share at least 1 piece of third-party content each week and 1 piece of original content (i.e. compiled by you, someone in your team or your wider firm) that’s going to be RELEVANT to your connections or fellow group members.
In addition, aim to comment on, like or share 1 piece of content shared by a connection and someone in one of your groups.

# 6: Taking a short-term ‘sales’ approach

No-one’s on LinkedIn to be sold to.

They’re on there to network, to learn and, yep, to sell. But to sell in a none-salesy way. Before you can even attempt to sell, you have to DEMONSTRATE your value and help others.

It’s fine to use Inmail and ask for introductions but you’d better be damn sure to spell out the VALUE to the other person of doing what you ask of them. And it’s going to be much more effective if people ‘know’, like and have begun to trust you first.

Solution: Be active by sharing helpful content, helping others and commenting on their discussions. Position yourself by being generous. Then, when you ask for help or a meeting, people are much more likely to say ‘yes’. And the outcome is much more likely to be positive.

# 7: Ignoring the power of LinkedIn groups

LinkedIn groups are a great tool to reach more of your ideal prospects and another place to position yourself with your clients and other connections.

By joining well-managed groups to which you can add value, you can begin to extend your reach.

You will need to find these groups though (which can be difficult given that the majority are a waste of space either because they’re inactive or full of spam).

Solution: join well-managed groups and consider setting up your own either as a team or in conjunction with one or two non-competing professionals. Building a group is a great way to set up a community of people with a common interest and to become a valuable resource to them over time. If you want to know how to set up and run a group that people want to join, get our Complete Guide to LinkedIn Groups eBook for NZ$18.97,

# 8: A lack of measurement or measuring the wrong things

There’s little point in measuring things that have nothing to do with you achieving your goals. Vanity metrics such as number of likes, shares etc. are flattering but are they helping you get to where you want to be?

If not then ignore them.

Solution: pick a few key measures that are aligned with your objectives. Measure your performance over time and in conjunction with your other initiatives so that you can assess LinkedIn’s impact. Where possible, benchmark against past data so that you know whether what you’re doing is working.

It’s incredibly easy to waste time on LinkedIn. Yet it can be an AMAZINGLY powerful tool if used sensibly.

What other mistakes have you made, or seen other professionals making, on LinkedIn? 

If you want to stop wasting time on LinkedIn and start harnessing it’s power to grow your practice, sign up for our 10 week mini-course and be first to hear about our forthcoming online course with actionable modules “Grow your Practice with LinkedIn: for lawyers”, your roadmap to LinkedIn success.

Image Credit: elderderekbird.blogspot.com

How to use LinkedIn to power up your events

How can you use LinkedIn to get more mileage from events that you run?

How to use LinkedIn to power your event

If you’re putting in the effort to set up an event, you want to make sure you get it right…

It’s got to be relevant to the intended audience

You want the right speakers

And, you want to get the right people along to it.

How can LinkedIn help when planning an event?

- You can use LinkedIn to identify and reach out to potential speakers. They could be fellow members of a LinkedIn group, high profile specialists in their field or people with great moderation skills.

LinkedIn allows you to reach beyond your direct network and get the RIGHT speakers for your audience.

- You can use LinkedIn to informally poll people about what they’d like to get from the event or see covered. While LinkedIn’s removed its Poll feature, you can start a discussion in a relevant group along the lines of:

“If you were to attend an event on X, what’s the one thing you’d want to find out/get from it and why?”

- You can also email up to 50 of your contacts at once – just remember to uncheck the ‘allow recipients to see each other’s names and email addresses’ box.

An added advantage of doing these things is that you’re alerting those you want to attend your event early on in the piece. 

- You may wish to set up an early-bird list so that you can communicate with those who sign up prior to the event.

How can LinkedIn help when promoting your event?

When promoting the event, you can:

Ask your team members to put up the events on their profile. There’s no longer an event section but you could get them to either add a link to the event page of your website at the bottom of their summary section (good because it’s visual) or add the ‘courses’ section and list it there (probably not the intended use for that section but it would work and you could then move it up your profile for a few weeks to promote the event).

- Post into relevant groups’ promotions sections - or, if they allow you to post to the main feed, you may wish to do so – provided the event is relevant to members. If the updates are relevant then definitely post them to groups.

Set up a banner (as a roving spotlight) on your company page so people can link through to the sign up page from there and put it out as an update from your company page – segmenting your audience where appropriate. You may also want to promote the event using the sponsored updates feature.

How can you use LinkedIn post event?

Post event you could:

- Put together a blog post covering the main points and/or share your slides (e.g. using Slideshare) with your connections and in relevant groups.

- Share short soundbites or snippets of info that work as stand alone pieces.

- Ask questions of your connections and group members that relate to the event or pose questions that were asked by your audience.

- Put the event up as a webinar that people can sign up for.

There’s probably a tonne more you can do, so I’d love to hear your ideas and what’s worked for you.

Please leave a comment below.

Grow your Practice with LinkedInIf you’d like to understand how to make LinkedIn work for you or wish to train multiple lawyers in how it can help them, sign up for our 10 week mini-course and be first to hear about our forthcoming online course with actionable modules “Grow your Practice with LinkedIn: for lawyers”, your roadmap to LinkedIn success.

Image Credit: www.afterburnproductions.com

Social media: Are you benefiting from the subliminal messaging effect?

Subliminal stimuli are any sensory stimuli below an individual’s threshold for conscious perception (Wikipedia)

They’re designed to influence by circumventing the conscious awareness and were used in advertising (until subliminal advertising was banned in the UK and Australia in 1958).

Are you benefiting from the subliminal messaging effect?

Benefiting from the subliminal messaging effect

While we don’t use subliminal messaging on social networks, one of the key benefits of sharing content relevant to your niche has a similar effect.

Over time, almost sub-consciously, people start to associate you with the content you share (e.g. if you regularly share telecommunications related pieces, people will link you with telecoms).

Essentially, you’ll become synonymous with the content you share.

Benefiting from the familiarity principle

And, because you’re posting content consistently, you’ll also benefit from the familiarity principle.

People in your groups, communities, your connections, followers and friends will feel like they know you (even if you’ve never met) and over time, will start to trust you.

It’s a bit like when you’re travelling, are feeling thirsty and walk into a shop to be faced with an array of drinks (none of which you’ve ever heard of) and a can of Coke. Provided you like Coke, you’re much more likely to choose it over the other drinks because it’s familiar to you.

By frequently sharing content that is valuable to those in your network and staying top of mind you’ll increase the likelihood that, when one of them has a need in your area, they will call you.

If you’re not regularly sharing relevant content via social networks then you’re missing a trick and making it easy for your competitors to steal a march on you.

Can you really afford to do so?

How have you benefited from the subliminal messaging effect or the familiarity principle?

Image Credit: rileyquinnauthor.blogspot.com