Can professionals get business from Facebook?

by Kirsten Hodgson

Jay Pinkert wrote a great post a few weeks ago titled ‘It’s time for Legal Marketers to put Facebook away’

He says legal marketers should:

“take a pragmatic, unsentimental and non-magical thinking look at their Facebook activities and make a tough decision on whether to continue the quixotic pursuit of the unicorn called Facebook marketing success.”

I have to admit, I’m not aware of any professional services firms that have generated work from Facebook via their company pages, although there are a couple that have built a community by connecting with people at a personal level.

And, of course, there are several that have assisted with graduate recruitment.

But are company Facebook pages a good lead generation tool?

I don’t believe so (but I’d love to be proved wrong!)

However, reaching out to people from your personal Facebook account can be.

I know an accountant in New Zealand who brings in between $20,000-$30,000 of new business each year from Facebook. He joined Facebook groups where property investors congregated, had conversations and shared information valuable to them. As a result a number asked him to connect with them and he began receiving work.

And there’s a lawyer who’s started to get relationship property and divorce work via her network as a result of asking questions and sharing articles those either entering or exiting a relationship will be interested in.

A number of her Facebook friends are at this stage in their lives, or know someone who is. As a result they either respond to her posts or share them with others who do.

The boundary between our professional and personal lives is blurring

Many of us are not comfortable with the blurring of the boundary between our professional and personal lives.

But in this day and age, where there are so many competing businesses vying for attention, it is easy for company pages to get lost. I don’t know about you but, even if I like a page I tend to gloss over any content that appears on my wall.

However, I read my friends’ posts much more carefully. If they were to post something that could help me or another of my friends, I’d definitely get in touch.

So, maybe that’s the way to go.

Perhaps we should do away with professional service firms Facebook pages that have been set up for lead generation and encourage those people in our teams comfortable doing so, to build relevant professional content into their personal streams.

It can yield results.

What’s your view?

Have you won any business via your firm’s Facebook page? I’d love to hear from you.

 

 

Specialising in professional services and law firm marketing. I help firms to retain and grow existing clients and attract more of their ideal clients. My core services include social media for lead generation, voice of the client programmes and tender strategy and development. Outside of work I love to run. I’m a bit like Forest Gump in that I’m not that quick but can keep going for ages. I also enjoy coming up with new inventions. Unfortunately, most of them have already been invented! | * Professional services marketing consultant | * Legal marketing consultant | * Law firm marketing consultant
  • https://facebook.com/lelitenetwork L’Elite

    I think the problem is marketers are always chasing potential customers instead of building good relationship with people and providing them with useful information.

    People likes brands which listen to them, provide them something useful and which don’t see them as money trees. At least that’s what I believe, some marketers are so focused on making money, they usually forget people wants to connect first in order to buy later.

    • http://marketingforprofessionals.co.nz/ Kirsten Hodgson

      Hi,

      Thanks for your comment. I agree that building relationships is key and, as you say, that includes letting people have their say and listening to them.