Professionals: stop wasting your time on LinkedIn

“‘Cheshire Puss,’ she began, rather timidly, as she did not at all know whether it would like the name: however, it only grinned a little wider. `Come, it’s pleased so far,’ thought Alice, and she went on. `Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?’

‘That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,’ said the Cat.

`I don’t much care where–’ said Alice.

`Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,’ said the Cat.

`–so long as I get SOMEWHERE,’ Alice added as an explanation.

`Oh, you’re sure to do that,’ said the Cat, `if you only walk long enough.’”  ~Lewis Carroll in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Professionals: stop wasting your time on LinkedIn

It seems that many professionals are on LinkedIn but are doing nothing with it. Like Alice, they’re wandering aimlessly. Yet many think that LinkedIn’s going to miraculously deliver them some work.

It won’t.

Not unless you put the time and effort in and use it purposefully.

The top 8 ways professionals waste time on LinkedIn and a solution for each!

# 1: Not being clear about what you want LinkedIn to help you to achieve and how you’re going to use it

If you don’t have clear goals then what are you going to measure?

And how are you going to use the platform consistently over time to:

  • expand your knowledge,
  • position yourself,
  • overcome being pigeon-holed,
  • stay top of mind with your existing clients and/or
  • attract more of your ideal prospects?

Solution: download our LinkedIn action plan template and use it to determine how you will use the platform.

# 2: Using LinkedIn in isolation

LinkedIn works best when it’s used to support your other efforts. It can be a catalyst for getting new work but it’s rarely the sole reason why. Yet it can add rocket-fuel to your existing business development and marketing initiatives.

If you want to know how, take a look at the posts highlighted below, each of which deal with a different aspect of professional services firm’s BD and marketing activities:

How can professional services firms use social media to increase their tender success rate?

11 ways to showcase your expertise using social media 

Social media: firing up key client and practice group planning

How to use LinkedIn to power up your events

Solution: Think about how LinkedIn can support your existing initiatives and incorporate this into your strategy.

# 3: Having a sub-standard profile

There is NO excuse for a sub-standard profile.

You’re a professional.

You want to make a good impression on both your existing connections, business partners, referrers and prospects.

How are you going to do that if you can’t even pull a decent profile together?

Solution: If you’re on LinkedIn to develop your practice, PLEASE PLEASE (at the very least) do the following:

- Upload a professional looking photo

- Make sure your professional headline says what you do or who and how you can help

- Customize your public profile URL (so that you get found before others’ who share your name)

- Complete the summary section setting out:

  • Who you help
  • What you help them with
  • Your approach to working with your clients
  • Some results you’ve achieved
  • A bit about your interests outside of work
  • A call to action.
- Upload or add links, tips, Whitepapers, presentations, videos…or anything that will help to EVIDENCE your capabilities. You can do so at the bottom of the summary section, and in the experience and education sections.
- List your skills in the skills and endorsements section. Make it easy for people to endorse you for skills for which you wish to be recognised. Otherwise, you’re likely to find yourself being endorsed for skills you don’t have (thanks to LinkedIn’s algorithm that determines suggestions in the blue box that appears on users homepages every now and again!)
- Make it easy for people to contact you by including your contact details within your profile – both in the contact info section and in the section RIGHT down the bottom ‘Contact [Name] for…’

# 4: not taking an active approach to connecting with others

LinkedIn at a very basic level is a living, breathing address book where people update their own details. It’s likely to be much more up-to-date than many professional services firms’ CRMs.

The more people you connect to, the more people see your status updates. You can use these to position yourself but if you’re not connected to many people then hardly anyone will see them.
And you won’t get as good search results when using LinkedIn’s Advanced Search feature (unless you opt for a paid account, or Xray search into LinkedIn using Google). This means it won’t be as useful a planning and research tool as it could be.
Solution: Connect to your colleagues (this will help you market yourself internally), your clients, referrers, and other business contacts and nurture these contacts – share status updates that they’re going to find useful.
Whenever you return from a new business meeting or event, invite the person/people you met to connect with you. Aim to grow your connections over time.

# 5: Inactivity

If you’ve decided you ONLY want to use LinkedIn as a living address book then don’t worry about being active.

BUT if you want to position yourself or grow your practice you need to get active. Otherwise you’re missing out on the opportunity to become synonymous with the work you do and to stay top of mind with the people you want to help.
Essentially, you’re making it easy for them to choose one of your competitors over you!
Solution: Aim to share at least 1 piece of third-party content each week and 1 piece of original content (i.e. compiled by you, someone in your team or your wider firm) that’s going to be RELEVANT to your connections or fellow group members.
In addition, aim to comment on, like or share 1 piece of content shared by a connection and someone in one of your groups.

# 6: Taking a short-term ‘sales’ approach

No-one’s on LinkedIn to be sold to.

They’re on there to network, to learn and, yep, to sell. But to sell in a none-salesy way. Before you can even attempt to sell, you have to DEMONSTRATE your value and help others.

It’s fine to use Inmail and ask for introductions but you’d better be damn sure to spell out the VALUE to the other person of doing what you ask of them. And it’s going to be much more effective if people ‘know’, like and have begun to trust you first.

Solution: Be active by sharing helpful content, helping others and commenting on their discussions. Position yourself by being generous. Then, when you ask for help or a meeting, people are much more likely to say ‘yes’. And the outcome is much more likely to be positive.

# 7: Ignoring the power of LinkedIn groups

LinkedIn groups are a great tool to reach more of your ideal prospects and another place to position yourself with your clients and other connections.

By joining well-managed groups to which you can add value, you can begin to extend your reach.

You will need to find these groups though (which can be difficult given that the majority are a waste of space either because they’re inactive or full of spam).

Solution: join well-managed groups and consider setting up your own either as a team or in conjunction with one or two non-competing professionals. Building a group is a great way to set up a community of people with a common interest and to become a valuable resource to them over time. If you want to know how to set up and run a group that people want to join, get our Complete Guide to LinkedIn Groups eBook for NZ$18.97,

# 8: A lack of measurement or measuring the wrong things

There’s little point in measuring things that have nothing to do with you achieving your goals. Vanity metrics such as number of likes, shares etc. are flattering but are they helping you get to where you want to be?

If not then ignore them.

Solution: pick a few key measures that are aligned with your objectives. Measure your performance over time and in conjunction with your other initiatives so that you can assess LinkedIn’s impact. Where possible, benchmark against past data so that you know whether what you’re doing is working.

It’s incredibly easy to waste time on LinkedIn. Yet it can be an AMAZINGLY powerful tool if used sensibly.

What other mistakes have you made, or seen other professionals making, on LinkedIn? 

If you want to stop wasting time on LinkedIn and start harnessing it’s power to grow your practice, sign up for our 10 week mini-course and be first to hear about our forthcoming online course with actionable modules “Grow your Practice with LinkedIn: for lawyers”, your roadmap to LinkedIn success.

Image Credit: elderderekbird.blogspot.com

How to use LinkedIn to power up your events

How can you use LinkedIn to get more mileage from events that you run?

How to use LinkedIn to power your event

If you’re putting in the effort to set up an event, you want to make sure you get it right…

It’s got to be relevant to the intended audience

You want the right speakers

And, you want to get the right people along to it.

How can LinkedIn help when planning an event?

- You can use LinkedIn to identify and reach out to potential speakers. They could be fellow members of a LinkedIn group, high profile specialists in their field or people with great moderation skills.

LinkedIn allows you to reach beyond your direct network and get the RIGHT speakers for your audience.

- You can use LinkedIn to informally poll people about what they’d like to get from the event or see covered. While LinkedIn’s removed its Poll feature, you can start a discussion in a relevant group along the lines of:

“If you were to attend an event on X, what’s the one thing you’d want to find out/get from it and why?”

- You can also email up to 50 of your contacts at once – just remember to uncheck the ‘allow recipients to see each other’s names and email addresses’ box.

An added advantage of doing these things is that you’re alerting those you want to attend your event early on in the piece. 

- You may wish to set up an early-bird list so that you can communicate with those who sign up prior to the event.

How can LinkedIn help when promoting your event?

When promoting the event, you can:

Ask your team members to put up the events on their profile. There’s no longer an event section but you could get them to either add a link to the event page of your website at the bottom of their summary section (good because it’s visual) or add the ‘courses’ section and list it there (probably not the intended use for that section but it would work and you could then move it up your profile for a few weeks to promote the event).

- Post into relevant groups’ promotions sections - or, if they allow you to post to the main feed, you may wish to do so – provided the event is relevant to members. If the updates are relevant then definitely post them to groups.

Set up a banner (as a roving spotlight) on your company page so people can link through to the sign up page from there and put it out as an update from your company page – segmenting your audience where appropriate. You may also want to promote the event using the sponsored updates feature.

How can you use LinkedIn post event?

Post event you could:

- Put together a blog post covering the main points and/or share your slides (e.g. using Slideshare) with your connections and in relevant groups.

- Share short soundbites or snippets of info that work as stand alone pieces.

- Ask questions of your connections and group members that relate to the event or pose questions that were asked by your audience.

- Put the event up as a webinar that people can sign up for.

There’s probably a tonne more you can do, so I’d love to hear your ideas and what’s worked for you.

Please leave a comment below.

Grow your Practice with LinkedInIf you’d like to understand how to make LinkedIn work for you or wish to train multiple lawyers in how it can help them, sign up for our 10 week mini-course and be first to hear about our forthcoming online course with actionable modules “Grow your Practice with LinkedIn: for lawyers”, your roadmap to LinkedIn success.

Image Credit: www.afterburnproductions.com

Social media: Are you benefiting from the subliminal messaging effect?

Subliminal stimuli are any sensory stimuli below an individual’s threshold for conscious perception (Wikipedia)

They’re designed to influence by circumventing the conscious awareness and were used in advertising (until subliminal advertising was banned in the UK and Australia in 1958).

Are you benefiting from the subliminal messaging effect?

Benefiting from the subliminal messaging effect

While we don’t use subliminal messaging on social networks, one of the key benefits of sharing content relevant to your niche has a similar effect.

Over time, almost sub-consciously, people start to associate you with the content you share (e.g. if you regularly share telecommunications related pieces, people will link you with telecoms).

Essentially, you’ll become synonymous with the content you share.

Benefiting from the familiarity principle

And, because you’re posting content consistently, you’ll also benefit from the familiarity principle.

People in your groups, communities, your connections, followers and friends will feel like they know you (even if you’ve never met) and over time, will start to trust you.

It’s a bit like when you’re travelling, are feeling thirsty and walk into a shop to be faced with an array of drinks (none of which you’ve ever heard of) and a can of Coke. Provided you like Coke, you’re much more likely to choose it over the other drinks because it’s familiar to you.

By frequently sharing content that is valuable to those in your network and staying top of mind you’ll increase the likelihood that, when one of them has a need in your area, they will call you.

If you’re not regularly sharing relevant content via social networks then you’re missing a trick and making it easy for your competitors to steal a march on you.

Can you really afford to do so?

How have you benefited from the subliminal messaging effect or the familiarity principle?

Image Credit: rileyquinnauthor.blogspot.com

Law firm social media success story: case study

Michael Denmead is a solicitor at Barr Ellison Solicitors in Cambridge, UK.

He is an active social media user who runs both the social media for solicitors group on LinkedIn and the community of the same name on Google+. He also looks after his firm’s social media presence.

I talked to him about:

  • which social networks he uses,
  • why he uses them,
  • what’s worked well for him and his firm, and
  • what tips he’d give to lawyers wanting to build their practices using social media.

Why should lawyers and law firms use social media?

I believe the conservative approach needs to be dropped. If lawyers and firms can determine how they want to communicate their brand via social media and stick to this then they’d be mad not to use these networks. You have the opportunity to be in front of your target market and to clearly communicate your messages. If you have the necessary resources then you’ve got to use these networks in order to be visible to your target market.

Which social networks do you use and how?

On Twitter we RT (retweet) everything to do with our local market and community and initiate conversations with other Cambridge-based businesses and people. It’s really easy to connect with others using Twitter. I’ve even had one client set up a meeting with me via Twitter and then DM (private message using Twitter) me to tell me she was going to be late. She knows I’m on there and it’s her communication tool of choice.

Google+ is another tool that makes it easy to connect to others. Using Google+ is about being visible. It’s still underused in the UK market so getting traction has been slow but other businesses are now starting to use the platform.

All our 25 lawyers have a professional profile (completed to a minimum standard) on LinkedIn.We expect them to connect with their clients and key referrers to help them stay visible to these people. It is difficult to have one to one conversations on LinkedIn and it’s hard work, but we need to be there and to be seen.

I’ve connected all our accounts to our company page and use Socialoomph to push out our content. Socialoomph allows me to post information to relevant lawyers’ accounts. For example, if we write a blog post on a commercial property issue, I will go into Socialoomph and schedule a LinkedIn post to go out from each of the commercial property team members’ accounts at different times. It means we don’t have to rely on them putting out this info themselves. They can concentrate on doing their jobs.

Socialoomph automatically distributes content according to your instruction. It’s irritatingly difficult to get to grips with when you first use it, but now it takes me 10 minutes max to set everything up. It has an automatic workaround for Twitter to ensure you don’t post the same Tweet twice. The only network it doesn’t work with is Google+. At Barr Ellison we practise in 7 areas of law so I have set up 7 queues of content in Socialoomph.

Each of our seven practice areas is expected to blog once a month (sometimes one post will cover two areas so there are months when we have less than 7 posts going out). Teams can share the responsibility of compiling a post to prevent it from becoming too onerous.

What successes have you seen as a result of your social media activity?

We were recently asked to bid for some work for a large business in Cambridge. That business is a big user of social media and our social media presence helped to put us in the frame.

On the whole successes are hard to quantify because we’ve always been committed to marketing and social media is simply another set of tools we’re using to communicate with our target audience. Things we can say are:

  • We measure revenue and know that roughly 20% of our revenue comes from the web. 
  • We recently tested the effectiveness of Google Adwords by making a deliberate decision to drop it for 4 months. We saw a substantial drop off in web visits and revenue. We know that for every pound we spend on Adwords we get back between £4 and £7 in revenue.

Our aim is to be on page 1 using a combination of Adwords, Google Places and SEO. We include long tail keywords in our blog posts and blog in the local paper too.

What’s worked well for you?

Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, blogging and Adwords are all working well for us. It’s a matter of repeat, repeat, repeat as this is vital to get noticed.

Our new WordPress website is also working well. We know that revenue has increased since its launch. It allows us to produce better content, display video (not yet launched) etc. and because of that our social media activity is a lot more confident.

Having a good website is really important if you’re doing social media, as is getting out content regularly. It’s hard though so you have to make it an easy process for people. Our team members need to write and own their content (they can dictate it) but once they’ve drafted it I’ll make sure that everything else is done for them, including putting in the image, coming up with a headline, building in SEO, posting and distributing it via their accounts.

What hasn’t worked so well?

Facebook is hard work for law firms. It has been slow to get traction. It seems to be the general interest posts that people want to see – for example, we do a Charity Run at Christmas and posted some photos. We got a lot of likes and comments on that! I’d say we’re getting there slowly!

What advice would you give to other lawyers and law firms wanting to leverage social media?

Take your time and do it carefully as you need to look good and polished. If you’re starting out, adopt a listening strategy focusing on your target market as this will inform your activity. Everything you do and say needs to communicate to your key market and have your key market in mind.

Then never lose that focus. Remember not to express a political or religious opinion because you WILL offend one of your clients.

Lastly, be consistently active. 

What other tips would you add to Michael’s? 

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Image courtesy ddpavumba at Freedigitalphotos.net

10 tips for lawyers and accountants to avoid being pigeon-holed

“Clients don’t know what we do” 

Does this sound familiar?

It’s a common complaint I hear from those in law firms, accounting firms and other professional services firms.

But why should clients know what you do?

Or care for that matter?

They only care about how you can help them.

It’s very easy to get pigeon-holed (I know I have been – lots of times). You help a client out in a specific area. They see you as someone who specialises in that area but they don’t automatically know how else you can assist.

Sending them a credential statement, a brochure or having a single conversation with them won’t cut it.

Understanding their needs (ask probing questions if you don’t already know) and then regularly sharing helpful content that helps to address these needs and, at the same time positions you, will. It’s a bit like subliminal advertising (only it’s legal) in that you share information about tax often enough, people are going to start associating you with tax. And when they have a need, you’re more likely to be top of mind than your competitors who haven’t been as proactive.

Of course you want to be front of mind should your clients have a need in a particular area that falls within your expertise and be looking for help. In order to be in their choice set you need to use the full range of tools/channels available consistently over time…and gradually perceptions will change. I’ve really focused on this with one client in particular and have recently got work in an area they would never previously have considered me for.

How can you change perceptions and let clients know how else you might be able to help? Here are 10 ideas. On their own they don’t amount to much, but collectively they will make a difference.

  1. Hold an annual planning meeting with key clients designed to uncover their key issues and focus over the coming year and to showcase your expertise by providing them with some initial advice/tips/guidance that they will find valuable.
  2. Call your top 5 clients when issues arise that they need to know about. Let them know how these issues may impact them and offer to talk to their staff about this. Better still, call them when you become aware of issues to give them a heads up. Be the person to put an issue on their radar.
  3. Keep close to your clients. Catch up with them regularly (on the phone or over coffee) and ask how things are going and what they’re doing. Follow their social media accounts and share, comment on or like their posts where appropriate. If you can position yourself as a sounding board and someone who adds value they’ll likely come to you before engaging others anyway.
  4. Go and visit your client’s office/site. Really get to know their business. You may come away with some ideas to help them that you can then sound them out about.
  5. Put together an Infographic setting out the full range of your services and linking it back to specific problems you can help address…or produce a series of Infographics on topics/issues that will be of interest to your clients and share these with them.
  6. Compile and share case studies about how you’ve helped others in the past. Don’t forget to say how these are relevant to other clients. You can post these to your website (both in relevant expertise sections and your bio in written, video or audio format or a combination of these), upload to LinkedIn, include one in each of your newsletters etc. Rotate these so that you deal with a different area each time and keep coming back to them.
  7. Put together blog posts and videos on topical issues or frequently asked questions in each of the areas in which you work and share these on your website, via social networks, via email, in your newsalerts or newsletter etc.
  8. Share third party posts and videos on topical issues related to the areas in which you work. Make yourself a ‘go to’ source of information by doing people’s reading for them.
  9. Consider if you can include the areas in which you can help clients in your email signoff, on the back of your business cards etc. This will depend on your brand guidelines and needs to be done consistently across your firm or your brand look will be inconsistent.
  10. Think about whether there is a way to convey how you can help your clients that will be visible on their desks – e.g. do they have/need a pen holder, a calendar or something infinitely more exciting but still as useful!

The point I am trying to make is that ‘clients understanding exactly what you do’ doesn’t occur overnight. You need to communicate consistently over time, in a variety of ways if you want your clients to truly understand how you can help them. Ultimately, if you can position yourself as someone who can point them in the right direction when they do have an issue, you’ll likely hear about the opportunities first.

What’s your view? 

What other tips would you share? 

Image courtesy freedigitalphotos.net

How to get lawyers & accountants to buy into LinkedIn

Last week a client asked me:

How do you encourage engagement and participation from lawyers on LinkedIn?

How to get lawyers & accountants to buy into LinkedIn

The next day I saw a post by a legal marketing professional asking the same thing.

Here’s a summary of the answer I gave them:

Lawyers and other professionals will only be active on LinkedIn if they can see the benefits: they need to know how they can use the platform to help them achieve their individual (and team) goals, and how it can support everything they’re already doing.

Share case studies

One of the most powerful ways to get lawyers, accountants and other professionals to understand how LinkedIn can benefit them is to share case studies of how others have used the platform successfully. If they see how and why others have used it, they begin to see the possibilities for themselves.

Ideally use case studies from within your firm but, if you don’t have any, then here are 5 great case studies (click the free chapter link and they’ll download. You don’t need to provide any info to see these). 

Perform an Advanced Search

Another good tactic is to sit down with the person, ask them about their ideal client and then perform an Advanced Search. When lawyers, accountants and other professionals see that their ideal clients are on LinkedIn, they realise they need to be on there too.

The Advanced Search feature allows you to search by company, job title, keyword, industry sector, location and more (or a combination thereof and it supports Boolean searches).

Remember though, that the searches will return richer information the more people you are connected to. That’s because, on the free LinkedIn account, you can see full profile information for those people to whom you are directly connected, your second degree connections and fellow group members. You can only see limited info for third degree connections and those outside your network.

Show them how a LinkedIn presence can help them get found online

If the professional you’re working with is on LinkedIn or has a common name and is having difficulty getting found online, show them how LinkedIn profiles appear high up search results. Log out of Google and then perform a search on their name. This will help in one of two ways: if they are on LinkedIn but still have a skeletal profile it will highlight that they need to develop a good profile or remove themselves from LinkedIn; if they aren’t on LinkedIn and have a common name or share a name with a celebrity it will highlight that having a LinkedIn presence can help them to get found.

Find groups to which those they want to build relationships with belong

Help the person to find and join groups to which their clients and ideal prospects belong. To identify these groups you could look at people’s profiles and see which groups they have listed (n.b. some may be hidden but the majority won’t be because the default setting is to display these); or use LinkedIn’s search feature and type in your keyword. If you then click on the magnifying glass and select ‘groups’ from the left hand side of the screen which appears, you’ll see a list of related groups. These will typically be organised from the largest to the smallest.

You can very quickly scroll down the list, see who in the person’s network is a member and either look at the group profile (if it’s a closed group) or look at the group discussions and activity (if it’s open). You can then make a call about whether or not the group is worth joining.

Walk them through how LinkedIn can help them achieve THEIR goals

Lastly, I would go through the person’s marketing plan (or key client, industry sector or practice group plan) with them and show them how LinkedIn (and other social networks) can help them achieve their goals. 

The hardest thing for professionals is knowing what they should be doing beyond creating a profile. In early 2014 I’ll be launching a modular online training course “Grow your practice with LinkedIn: for lawyers” and will then be rolling this out to other professionals. Details will follow in the New Year.

What else would you add? 

How has LinkedIn helped you to achieve your goals? 

 

 

 

 

New LinkedIn feature to monitor engagement on your status updates

Over the past few weeks LinkedIn’s been quietly rolling out a new way to monitor engagement on any status updates you share. It finally appeared on my account this weekend.

It’s called ‘Who’s viewed your updates’ and you’ll find it on the right hand side of your LinkedIn home page underneath the ‘Who’s viewed your profile’ section…if you can’t yet see it then expect it very soon!

How can you monitor engagement on your status updates?

You’re now able to see the number of times each of your updates has been viewed as well as the number of likes and comments. The great thing is you can click through to these if you missed them via your notifications.

LinkedIn new feature who's viewed your updates

When you hover over the circles LinkedIn allows you to ‘see news your connections might enjoy’ and ‘see trending news to share’. Clicking on these links takes you through to Pulse (the renamed LinkedIn Today) and those LinkedIn influencers you follow. It’s a shame it doesn’t actually show you trending news from those in your network as that would be far more interesting.

However, you can opt to follow a number of publishers (click on the ‘All Publishers’ link on the Pulse toolbar) and, if you set up Pulse on your mobile, can follow any blogs or publications you like. Unfortunately, these don’t seem to currently sync to the full version of LinkedIn.

On the whole it’s a great little addition that helps you:

  • Determine which of your posts get the most engagement.
  • See the reach of each post. As well as seeing the overall number of people who’ve seen your post, LinkedIn tells you the numbers according to their relationship to you, i.e. how many first degree connections saw it, how many second degree connections and how many third degree connections. To see these figures hover over the appropriate circle (the smallest one with the blue line around represents your first degree connections, the next one your second degree connections and the biggest your third degree connections).
Monitor engagement on LinkedIn
  • Identify the times of the day/week to post to get maximum exposure. If you keep a note of when you post things, LinkedIn tells you how many people in your network have seen the post (I assume by seen they mean ‘impressions’ so it doesn’t mean the people have read your post).

What do you think of this feature?

How else do you think it will help you?

 

Building your brand: The power of one click

As a professional you probably regularly consume content.

You may read the paper.

The trade press.

Blogs.

Newsletters.

You may watch things on YouTube.

Listen to the radio or to Podcasts.

And this is all great for your own interests and learning.

BUT you could be missing out on a trick.

Continue reading

How to set up the new LinkedIn Showcase Pages in your Company Pages (video)

LinkedIn’s just announced its new Showcase Pages, which are a great addition to your Company Pages. 

As LinkedIn says:

“LinkedIn members will be able to follow the specific brands and products they care most about that have Showcase Pages.”

This is great news for professional services firms. You can set up showcase pages for up to 10 of your services. People can choose to follow these pages in addition to, or instead of your company page, allowing them to self-select the info that’s relevant to them.

They’re another great way to share helpful content with other LinkedIn users and to build a community – essentially they’re all about sharing great content. But, unless you’re a big brand, it’ll likely take time to build your followers.

And you’ll need to think carefully about your capacity to manage these pages. They will need to be regularly updated (ideally at least weekly) so there is fresh content and you look on top of the issues. The good news is that you can use a mix of your own and third party content to position you so it shouldn’t be too onerous to find things to post.

This ‘how to’ video below shows you how to set up a showcase page (and how to delete one should you need to).

Tips for promoting your Showcase pages

There are so many ways to promote your Showcase Pages. Here’s a list of ideas to get you started:

  • Get relevant people within the firm to include links to these on their profiles (ideally at the bottom of the summary section).
  • Include links from relevant pages on your website to these showcase pages.
  • Include a link in your email signoff.
  • Mention this in your news-alerts, in client meetings, at the end of seminars or presentations.
  • Invite relevant contacts to follow a showcase page for news on ‘X’.
  • Pay for some of the really valuable posts to appear as sponsored updates in a certain demographic’s LinkedIn feed – a number may then follow a particular Showcase page in return.

How to set up the new LinkedIn Showcase Pages in your Company Pages

I’d love to know what you think of Showcase Pages. Let me know in the comments and please share Pages you’ve set up. And please share this post if you find it valuable. Thanks.

Social media: firing up key client & practice group planning

Social networks will never replace face-to-face communication.

But they can lead to more opportunities for in person meetings.

They can play a role at all stages of business development from planning through to client relationship management. I’ll look at this in a series of posts over the coming weeks but today want to focus on the planning stage.

How to use social media for your business development

How can you use social networks at the planning stage?

When compiling your key client, industry sector and/or practice group plans social networks can help you identify key players in specific organisations. This is particularly helpful in a number of situations: Continue reading