Tag Archives: LinkedIn invites

Should I connect with other lawyers on LinkedIn?

Lawyers regularly ask me this so I thought it worthy of a blog post.

The answer to this really comes down to your objectives. What is it you’re looking to achieve?

Should I connect with other lawyers on LinkedIn

There are some very good reasons why you might wish to connect with other lawyers, such as:

  • You wish to generate referrals from other lawyers
  • It’s a great way to keep track of former colleagues and friends who may one day move in-house
  • You want to pick up some tips from others’ activity.

I know some of you will be concerned that other lawyers will look through your contacts and try to poach them.

In order to prevent this, you have two options (other than not connecting with them):

  1. Be proactive and focus on providing your clients with excellent customer service and regularly sharing content they will find valuable and helpful. In all likelihood your competitors will be talking to your clients anyway, so this is always a key area on which to focus.
  2. Hide your connections on LinkedIn. This means your connections can only see details of shared connections (i.e. those connections you have in common). To do so, go to ‘Privacy & Settings’ (hover over the photo of you in the top right hand corner of your LinkedIn toolbar and select Privacy & Settings from the dropdown list – you may be prompted for your password), look under the ‘Privacy Controls’ header in your profile settings and select ‘See who can see your connections’. Choose ‘Only you’ from the drop-down box.

On one hand, LinkedIn is about networking and helping others in your network and it many people perceive it negatively when people hide their connections, but on the other if you act for Shell and you have lots of connections at BP this could cause issues with your client.

Ultimately, you have to do what’s right for you and make sure that your social media guidelines are flexible enough to allow others to do the same.

What are your views on connecting with other professionals in your industry?  Are you for or against?

Image Credit: www.jobinterviewtools.com

13 examples of good LinkedIn etiquette

Why do people behave differently on social networks than at in-person networking events?

What is good LinkedIn etiquette?

Is it that all rational thought goes out the window when facing a computer or device screen (I admit, it does sometimes seem that way) or is it that they’ve never been taught? Continue reading

What’s the etiquette when someone you don’t know invites you to connect on LinkedIn?

by Kirsten Hodgson

You receive an invite from someone you don’t know.

What should you do?

Firstly, you need to decide whether you want to connect with those you don’t know.

This will largely depend on your objectives for being on LinkedIn as well as any governing professional association’s (such as your Law Society or Bar Association) guidelines.

If it is permissible in your jurisdiction, there may be very good reasons why you would connect with people you have never met, such as influential journalists, prospects, prospective influencers and referrers, and those with whom you’ve had discussions within LinkedIn groups.

Secondly, take a look at the invitation. Have they made it clear why they want to connect with you or have they used the standard LinkedIn text?

While I advise against this, don’t hold it against people as LinkedIn doesn’t give you the option to tailor your invites if you try to connect through certain features – such as ‘People you may know’.

Next, take a look at the person’s profile. Are they someone with whom you want to connect?

You’ll need to use your judgement here – For example, I’m happy to connect with those in my industry sector, as well as people who share valuable content or who’ve been involved in the same group discussions.

If you’re unsure, you might want to send the person a message asking why they want to connect with you. If they respond to this you’ll know they genuinely do have a reason, if not, it could be that they’re just growing their connections.

To reply click on the small arrow next to the ‘Accept’ button.

If you think someone does want to connect just to grow their number of connections or if you don’t want to connect to someone for another reason, select ‘ignore’ and you’ll no longer see the invite. Save the ‘report spam’ button for true spammers.

 Will people know you’ve ignored their invite?

No they won’t. If they go into their ‘Sent’ box within the LinkedIn email system (when in invitations) they will only see that you haven’t responded. However, they won’t know that you’ve selected ‘ignore’. They may well try to connect with you again in future.

What other tips or advice would you share?